News

Lastest Bradley-Mason and industry news.

Expect the unexpected

Written on January 12, 2017 at 6:21 pm , by bradleymason

We recently carried out a survey in Hull and discovered that the light industrial unit we were surveying appeared to be of a typical steel portal frame with infill masonry block and profiled steel cladding,

We recently carried out a survey in Hull and discovered that the light industrial unit we were surveying appeared to be of a typical steel portal frame with infill masonry block and profiled steel cladding, which is all pretty straight forward and as expected, until we came across some impact damaged sections.

 The impact damages actually gave us an insight into the components used in the block mixture.  The blocks contained strands of sawdust.

 Whilst using sawdust in a concrete mixture is a non-standard method of manufacturing masonry blocks, there are many acknowledgments of this type of additive being studied and potentially being used in the construction industry. 

Following background research of the use of sawdust in concrete mixtures, it is clear to see a correlation between the material discovered onsite and to the material described as wood-crete in numerous texts. Wood Crete is basically made up of wood waste and was developed to provide an alternative material to help solve problems with the delivery of low-cost housing.

 Many researchers believed that wood-crete would have better insulation properties, resistance to water absorption, fire performance, and strength properties. All these advantages had a compromise, the blocks strength when comparing that to the strength of a normal concrete mix was weaker.  The blocks we discovered onsite were used as the material for an in-fill block wall so we did not have any immediate structural concerns when considering this strength compromise!!   

For those readers who are interested in finding out more, we suggest you take a look at  a journal titled ‘Development of Wood-Crete from Hardwood and Softwood Sawdust’ authored by Eboziegbe Patrick Aigbomian and Mizi Fan –  Department of Civil Engineering, Brunel University, London, UB8 3PH, UK.

Owen Black

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Jake Hopper – Update

Written on January 11, 2017 at 9:49 am , by bradleymason

Jake Hopper racing

We are very proud to sponsor and support Jake Hopper in his ever accelerating career in motorbike racing. It seems only yestreday we happily organised a new set of leathers for him but that was …

Jake Hopper racing

We are very proud to sponsor and support Jake Hopper in his ever accelerating career in motorbike racing. It seems only yestreday we happily organised a new set of leathers for him but that was back in 2015 and as young men do he has grown out of them all ready. So 2017 will see some new race gear for young Jake.

In other news Jake’s plans for 2017 took somewhat of a new direction which was certainly good news. He had a great season planned but due to an age restriction change he is now going to be riding in the Thundersport Superteens. Racing in this group means you will get see Jake racing on the full adult circuits like Donnington Park. This is a really big step up and we are very proud to be a part of Jake’s continued rise through the ranks.

Sponsoring Jake is exciting and very rewarding, he is a highly talented young rider but the motorsport world does not function on talent alone and we are very happy to help out where raw talent needs a leg up.

 

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Dilaps settlement Capital not Revenue

Written on January 10, 2017 at 2:25 pm , by bradleymason

Tadcaster Medical Centre – Case Study

Written on November 24, 2016 at 12:39 pm , by bradleymason

Tadcaster Medical Centre appointed Bradley Mason as Project Manager, Cost Consultant and CDM Co-ordinator to manage the refurbishment works following extensive flood damage to their property.

A prompt response was needed to inform the reinstatement …

Tadcaster Medical Centre appointed Bradley Mason as Project Manager, Cost Consultant and CDM Co-ordinator to manage the refurbishment works following extensive flood damage to their property.

A prompt response was needed to inform the reinstatement works required. The Bradley Mason team worked closely alongside the loss adjustor to assess the full extent of the damage as part of a timely but safe and diligent approach.

An initial feasibility study was undertaken to establish the extent of the damage with a full design and specification produced by our Project Management team.

During the length of the contract the Medical Centre remained open to ensure it could keep on serving the needs of the community of Tadcaster. This took extensive, careful and strategic planning to ensure the works could be completed safely, on time and to a high standard of finish.

The project was a success and the Medical Centre has now been reinstated, with the whole building handed back to the client. A successful outcome for the insurance company and the Medical Centre, which has a full functioning practice.

Before

Before

tmc-photos

After

 

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A very brief timeline to the age and characteristics of a building from 1900s through to 1960s!

Written on November 8, 2016 at 9:12 am , by bradleymason

1900-1930s Construction

Walls: – Solid external walls, on brick foundations. No damp course. (Damp courses were gradually introduced in the 1920s).

Roof: – Pitched timber roof, sheltered with slates or clay tiles, with no underfelt.…

1900-1930s Construction

Walls: – Solid external walls, on brick foundations. No damp course. (Damp courses were gradually introduced in the 1920s).

Roof: – Pitched timber roof, sheltered with slates or clay tiles, with no underfelt.

Ground floors: – Solid floor to kitchen and storage areas, and of suspended timber to further rooms and upper floors.

No Sarking felt or insulation and nail fatigue pre1930s

1930s -1940s Construction

Walls: – Cavity external walls were increasingly introduced, erected on concrete strip foundations with damp courses.

Roof: – Roofs underfelt, but still uninsulated.

Ground floors: – Bathrooms still positioned on the ground floor, usually directly off the kitchen.

1945-1950 Construction (Non-Traditional)

Walls: – Frame construction, clad with a variation of materials including asbestos, steel, aluminium, and concrete, traditional brickwork. Metal casement windows common in use.

Roof: – Trussed roofs of very low pitch.

Partitions: – Fibre and plasterboards were used for walls and ceilings.

Post 1930s, introduction of breathable roof membrane.

Traditional 1945-1960

Walls of a similar construction to 1930- 1940s although flat roofs were more common, constructed from either timber or concrete, felt or asphalt-covered, with parapet walls to the edges. 1950s, plastic gutters and pipes were accessible.

Services: – By the 1960s, many authorities started to introduce central heating systems.

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Hoytown FC Team Glows

Written on October 6, 2016 at 9:12 am , by bradleymason

hoytown-sept-16

Great new kit for the under 11’s Hoytown FC sponsored by Bradley Mason.…

hoytown-sept-16

Great new kit for the under 11’s Hoytown FC sponsored by Bradley Mason.

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Dry Rot – an introduction

Written on October 6, 2016 at 9:11 am , by bradleymason

A brief introduction to recognising wood rot

Dry wood is a naturally durable material which is resistant to most biological attacks. However, when the moisture content of the wood increases, and the damp conditions are …

A brief introduction to recognising wood rot

Dry wood is a naturally durable material which is resistant to most biological attacks. However, when the moisture content of the wood increases, and the damp conditions are prolonged the wood becomes vulnerable to attack.

Damp wood (above 20% moisture content) becomes a perfect habitat for wood-rotting fungi, which obtain their food by breaking down wood cells and in turn causing loss of strength of the wood.

Provided a building has a great design, good workmanship and the buildings maintenance is planned then preventing wood rotting fungi should not be an issue. However, in contrast, for many reasons, there are scenarios where an outbreak of wood rotting fungi are present and the following can help provide light on which type of wood-rotting fungi is present following undertaking immediate remedial measures to eliminate the source of dampness.

There are two types of wood rots: brown and white.

Brown rots – changes the colour of the wood to a darker colour and causes cracking across the grain of the wood. Very decayed wood when dry will crumble to dust.

White rots – the wood will become lighter and fibrous cause the wood to become lighter in colour and stringy in texture without any cross cracking.

All brown and white rots are collectively referred to as wet rots, with exception to one brown rot which is commonly referred to as dry rot (serpula lacrymans)

Whilst it is not really necessary to know all of the many species of wet rot, due to them having the same remedial measures. It is important to know the difference between the wet rots and the brown rot (dry rot)

The dry rot fungus has the incredible ability to spread far behind plaster and through wall materials such as brick. Effective remedial treatment can sometimes be much more expensive than wet rots.

 

Identifying fungal growths in buildings Dry Rot –
Fruit-bodies Yellow (young) or rusty redwith grey edges (mature),

then darkening with age.

Plate or bracket shape.

Mature surface has

shallow pores or folds.

 

Strands White to grey. Up to8 mm diameter.

Brittle when dry.

 

Mycelium White or grey sheetswith yellow or lilac tinges.

Tears in the direction of

Growth.

(text sourced from RECOGNISING WOOD ROT AND

INSECT DAMAGE IN BUILDINGS 2010)

 

If you require our assistance with timber decay, its recognition and remedial please get in touch and we will be able to advise further.

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Building regulations applied to low impact development

Written on September 22, 2016 at 9:10 am , by bradleymason

A number of small scale projects utilising low impact development practices have been successfully implemented throughout the UK. With a recognised housing crisis in the UK and the need to tackle the impact of global …

A number of small scale projects utilising low impact development practices have been successfully implemented throughout the UK. With a recognised housing crisis in the UK and the need to tackle the impact of global warming, applied on a larger scale, these methods could form part of a national solution.
Fairlie (1996, p.xiii) states “a low impact development is one that, through its low negative environmental impact, either enhances or does not significantly diminish environmental quality” and The Baker Associates report (2004) includes within its definition “the use of building materials which are reused and/or locally derived”.
Historically the most significant obstacle to low impact development has been the difficulty in obtaining planning permission. The Welsh government have integrated low impact development into the planning system and the first large scale project (9 dwellings) was approved in 2009. Due to their approved legal status this was one of the first times that low impact development and the requirements of the building regulations system had come into direct contact. A dispute arose between a number of developer/residents and the local council building control department. This resulted in the council taking legal action against a number of residents for non-compliance with the building regulations.
This disagreement was investigated (McIver, 2014) in an attempt to find the root causes of the dispute. “It was concluded that the dispute predominantly arose not only due to a lack of appropriate knowledge and experience amongst Lammas residents and the council but also due to the fundamentally different approaches adopted by these parties. The research showed that it was the approach both parties took to the application of the Building Regulations which gave rise to the conflict rather than any fundamental schism between low impact construction techniques and the Building Regulations” (McIver, 2014, p.i).
This conclusion indicated that properly managed and with good communication between the parties, compliance with building regulation should not hinder future low impact development. To facilitate the smooth running of future developments it was recommended that low impact developers work along building regulations professionals to provide documented methods that have been implemented and approved under the building regulations. Effectively an ‘approved document’ that building regulations inspectors can refer to with confidence when assessing methods of compliance that are unfamiliar to them.

The full report together with other relevant material can be found at http://lammas.org.uk/research/
References
Baker Associates (2006) Low Impact Development – Further Research. [internet]. Baker Associates, Bristol. Available from < http://lammas.org.uk/research/ > [Accessed 02 August 2016].
Fairlie, S. (1996) Low Impact Development, Planning and People in a Sustainable Countryside. Jon Carpenter, Charlbury.

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We can see them coming!!

Written on September 19, 2016 at 9:09 am , by bradleymason

First outing for Hoyland Town Junior FC for the new strip in a practice game. You can definitely see them coming.

hoytown-2016-kit-169x300

First outing for Hoyland Town Junior FC for the new strip in a practice game. You can definitely see them coming.

hoytown-2016-kit-169x300

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Inspiring Young Surveyors at “Grass Roots” Level.

Written on September 15, 2016 at 9:09 am , by bradleymason

There is a clear issue with inspiring a new, more diverse generation of youngster into becoming building surveyors. The issue was raised at this year’s annual Building Surveying Conference with a number of senior surveyors …

There is a clear issue with inspiring a new, more diverse generation of youngster into becoming building surveyors. The issue was raised at this year’s annual Building Surveying Conference with a number of senior surveyors crying out for more to be done to promote the profession.

As a recent Graduate Building Surveyor I am new to the profession and to be honest fell into the profession by chance. Until I turned up at Northumbria Universities open day I didn’t have a clue about what a Building Surveyor does on a day to day basis or the skills required to perform the job affectively. I believe this is the case with many people, not fully understanding what a Building Surveyor has to offer. This makes you think what are we doing incorrectly in terms of promoting the industry and what can be done to improve people’s knowledge?

One option, certainly not the only, is to do more at “grass roots” (pardon the football pun) level to entice the young in becoming Building Surveyors and choosing property related degrees. To achieve this the RICS has to create more initiatives to get local surveying firms into schools and to take on more apprentices or work experience placements. That said it’s not all down to the RICS and I understand schemes are currently in place but, we as Building Surveyors need to ensure we commit to promoting the industry and offer our time to help educate school pupils and make them become more interested in the profession. This in turn should help to reduce the skills shortage in the industry by improving surveyor related university degree enrolments.

As part of the inclusivity award recently granted to Bradley-Mason we are committed to promoting our profession within the local community by going in to schools and colleges and attempting to inspire young people to consider a career as a Building Surveyor

Hopefully by educating young people and promoting our profession, we can teach people about what this career has to offer and the job satisfaction and rewards of becoming a Building Surveyor.

Brenden Shildrick

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