News

Lastest Bradley-Mason and industry news.

The origin of Facilities Management.

Written on September 8, 2016 at 8:30 pm , by bradleymason

Facilities Management (FM) has long suffered from an acute identity crisis (Tay & Ooi, 2001). The profession is considered by some individuals as having no strategic orientation encompassing middle aged men with no professional qualifications …

Facilities Management (FM) has long suffered from an acute identity crisis (Tay & Ooi, 2001). The profession is considered by some individuals as having no strategic orientation encompassing middle aged men with no professional qualifications (Eltringham, 1999; Nourse, 1990).  It is believed to have taken until 1980 to gain a stronger presence within the construction industry, FM is still cited to be a relatively new developing discipline across the world (Atkin & Brooks, 2009; Barker, 2013; Ventovori, et al., 2007; Alexander, 2003).

The origin of FM is often speculated among academics, with Bröchner (2010) believing that the earliest account of the FM can be seen within the Roman times. Historian Frier revealed whilst studying preserved letters of Cicero that there is evidence to support the Roman link, as agents were used to manage the Roman Empire (1978, cited in Bröchner, 2010).   Jensen (2008) however argues that the claims do not directly relate to the constitution of modern corporate FM.

It is believed by some academics that FM’s closest link is to that of Fredrick Taylor’s Scientific Management in the 1900s, with the eras increased focus on office administration (Then & Akhlaghi, 1992; Duffy, 2000). Though Alexander (2003) considers the formation was popular during the 1980’s, a period that incorporated computers in the workplace. The recognition of global competition, increasing office space costs and persistent building defects is believed by Becker (1990, cited in, Jensen, 2008) to be evidence of the origin of the FM in the 1900s.

The British Institute of Facilities Management BIFM (2014) refer to the growth of FM whilst discussing the cost cutting initiative and the outsourcing of non-core activities that occurred during the 1970-80s.  It was later when professional organisations and associations became involved, leading to the profession expanding; with the first being the International Association for Facilities Management in the 1980s (Ventovori, et al., 2007).  Later in 1993, the British Institute of Facilities Managers was instituted. This formation was then followed by the introduction of specialised qualifications in FM (British Institute of Facilities Management, 2014).

Currently FM is recognised by further professional bodies, with each offering memberships and credentials (CIOB, 2014; RICS, 2014). Park (1998) ascertains that this level of recognition is one of the main influences to the profession being acknowledged with respect.

Whilst the origin of FM is disputed amongst academics, there are a number of professional bodies who accredit FM which has led to commonly cited definitions (Enoma, 2005; Chanter & Swallow, 2007).

 

Extract from Owen Black’s 2014 Dissertation ‘An investigation into Facilities Management: the profession’s contribution to the procurement of a new facility.’

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BM is awarded Inclusivity Quality Mark

Written on August 31, 2016 at 5:31 pm , by bradleymason

Only 3% of Chartered Surevyors in the 1980s were women. Over the last three decades this figure has only increased by a mere 10%, with only 13% of members of the RICS being female. With

Only 3% of Chartered Surevyors in the 1980s were women. Over the last three decades this figure has only increased by a mere 10%, with only 13% of members of the RICS being female. With more than half of the UK population being women, the construction sector is missing out!

However, it is hardly encouraging for women to join the industry when figures show that they would be paid a quarter less than their male colleagues. The RICS and MacDonald & Company UK Rewards and Attitudes Survey 2016 showed that the new entrants gender pay gap currently stands at 28.7%. This is the highest figure of all age groups, with the average gender pay gap between property professionals in 2016 standing at 25.9%, only slightly better than 2015’s 27%. The male dominated industry stands way above the general gender pay gap of 19% across the UK.

On 6th October 2016, new legislation will state that all companies with more than 250 employees must publish information on their gender pay gap. They will have to start calculating this in April 2017 and publish it no later than April 2018.

Businesses will be required to publish:

  • Overall gender pay gap figure based on both mean and median average hourly pay
  • The number of men and women in each of four pay bands
  • Information on the gender bonus gap and information on the proportion of men and women who received a bonus in the same 12-month period.

This will no doubt be embarrassing for many companies and hopefully encourage the urge to tackle and improve the issue of the gender pay gap and help promote women in the industry.

It was only last year that the first female in 147 years, Louise Brooke-Smith, was appointed as the global president of the RICS. Louise, who championed diversity and inclusivity, saw the launch of the Inclusive Employer Quality Mark, which will be discussed further on.

There are organiastions that support women and encourage their development within the industry. The Association of Women in Property work alongside businesses and industry organisations to try and redress the gender balance. They also work with schools and universities to encourage and nurture young talent to join the sector. whilst also run over 300 events a year across the country to ecourage networking and provide support.

Research has shown that the more diverse the organisation is, the better it performs and many individual firms are pioneering strategies to foster gender equality.

One important step the RICS have taken to change this is the introduction of The Inclusive Employer Quality Mark (IEQM). The IEQM was introduced last year and companies that choose to sign it, are committing to deliver against 6 Principles that will drive inclusivity into their firm and the profession.

The 6 Principles that make up the Inclusive Employer Quality Mark are as below:

  • Leadership and Vision
    1. Demonstrable commitment at the highest level to increasing the diversity of the workforce
  • Recruitment
    1. Engage and attract new people to the industry from under-represented groups; best practice recruitment methods
  • Staff development
    1. Training and promotion policies that offer equal access to career progression to all members of the workforce
  • Staff Retention
    1. Flexible working arrangements and adaptive working practices that provide opportunities for all to perform at their highest levels
  • Staff engagement
    1. An inclusive culture where all staff engage with developing, delivering, monitoring and assessing the diversity and inclusivity policies
  • Continuous Improvement
  1. Continually refreshing and renewing the firm’s commitment to being the best employer; sharing and learning from best practice across the industry.

There is no fee involved in becoming part of this and companies are assessed twice a year by filling out a self-assessment form. All firms that have signed the IEQM are listed on the RICS website. Online training is also being developed and businesses can support each other.

Bradley-Mason are proud to hold the Inclusive Employer quality mark which shows our commitment to inclusivity.

iNCLUSIVE EMPLOYER MARK

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jake Hopper News

Written on August 30, 2016 at 10:15 am , by bradleymason

We are very proud to young people in sport and Jake Hopper is one such person we support as a company.

Jake is currently charging ahead with a 2016 Championship win in mind but, as …

We are very proud to young people in sport and Jake Hopper is one such person we support as a company.

Jake is currently charging ahead with a 2016 Championship win in mind but, as always with motorsport, wins do not come easy. Unlike sports like running, motorsport involves and athlete as well as a very complex bit of machinery and sometimes no matter how good the rider is the machine can cause issues.

Recent Races

It is certainly a bit of a roller coaster season so far; Jake and the team have had some major bike problems over the last 2 rounds. These issues were not involving mechanical breakdowns as such but more around getting the bike to peak performance and top end speed.  In the last round (round 5) at Whilton Mill Jake qualified in 8th and finished all 3 races of the weekend in 8th too. This is a very consistent result, and considering the team had to re install older standard parts to the bike, one that should be celebrated. Overall this means he is running comfortably in 4th in the championships this year with 3 rounds remaining.

New Team

In other news the organisation running the championship, Cool Fab Racing, has merged with British Super Bikes which means each round is run as a mini British Super bike race including getting the trophies presented on the BSB podium. This also means 6 news major teams have joined and Jake has been chosen to ride for the Moto Rapido Ducati team which is amazing news. His bike will be re painted in team colours and he will also have some shiny new racing leathers to top off the look and make sure everyone knows who he is racing for. We are so proud of Jake and very pleased to be part of his ongoing success.

 

 

 

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CDM 2015 – How Bradley-Mason comply

Written on August 23, 2016 at 12:55 pm , by bradleymason

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) came into force on 6 April 2015, replacing CDM 2007. It is essential that as construction professionals we understand the different roles we play and obligations …

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) came into force on 6 April 2015, replacing CDM 2007. It is essential that as construction professionals we understand the different roles we play and obligations under legislation as well as more widely to clients, other construction professionals and to the public wherever they may be effected by our decisions and management.

We regularly undertake the role of principal designer, and overarching role coordinating the pre-construction aspects of health and safety. We also provide pure design roles and were recently asked how we ensure we meet our responsibilities as designers under Regulation 9 of CDM 2015.

Please see more at:

http://www.bradley-mason.com/commercial/project-management/cdm-regulations-2015/

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Asbestos – Something to look out for…..

Written on August 11, 2016 at 1:52 pm , by bradleymason

Something to look out for.

a sample of the ceiling tiles in the attached photo was taken whilst inspecting for dilapidations purposes. It came back positive and are Asbestos Insulation Boards. No labels on them, …

Something to look out for.

a sample of the ceiling tiles in the attached photo was taken whilst inspecting for dilapidations purposes. It came back positive and are Asbestos Insulation Boards. No labels on them, plenty of penetrations through them and a nice ceiling fan to waft around any dust…..

P.E West Croydon (13)

P.E West Croydon (14)
Need advice on Dilapidations or Asbestos please get in touch.

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Protimeter Salt Analysis

Written on August 9, 2016 at 4:46 pm , by bradleymason

Moisture is a primary cause of a large percentage of problems in buildings.

The rectification of the damage caused by moist conditions within building elements can be extremely problematic, troublesome and expensive to repair.

Blistering, …

Moisture is a primary cause of a large percentage of problems in buildings.

The rectification of the damage caused by moist conditions within building elements can be extremely problematic, troublesome and expensive to repair.

Blistering, corrosion, decay, delamination, efflorescence and freeze/thaw damage are just a few of the common defects associated with moisture in a building.

In order to support the results obtained from a measurement of moisture in building elements, it is essential to recognise the likely sources of damp. The determination of the source is an essential part of investigations into moisture-related defects.

Although there are many tools and methods utilised to help determine the source of damp, this post will concentrate on the Chemical Analysis to provide important clues as to the source and also highlight anomalies in moisture measurements to provide a crucial aid to correct diagnosis.

A chemical analysis can be carried out on salt deposits, plaster or wallpaper scrapings to determine the presence of two types of salts, nitrates and chlorides.

A useful guide for the interpretation of salt test results is as follows:

Nitrates + Chlorides + (may be moisture from the ground, tap water, other plumbing leaks or garden soil)

Nitrates + Chlorides – (a rare result from the ground is likely tap water)

Nitrates- Chlorides + (Tap water possible)

Nitrates – Chloride – Penetrating damp (rainwater) probably not tap water.

An example scenario is presented below, a damp basement with high levels of moisture entering through the brick wall. Moisture levels appear to increase with wet weather. Located above the area in question, a recently repaired rainwater gully. The increased moisture content when it rains, along with the test results below, provide further evidence that there are problems with the surface water drainage pipes  and are not likely to be problems mains water supply pipes. It was concluded that further investigations such as a CCTV survey of the drainage were required to identify any breaks in the drains, these provided evidence of damaged sections in close proximity the buildings frontage.

Test 1 – Location

Test 1 Sample Sample Location pic twoTest 1 Sample Sample Location

Test 1 – (Salt sample – likely to be rainwater) –Salt Sample Brown No Chlorides Present, Yellow: No Nitrates Present.

Test 1 - Salt Sample  No2.Test 1 - Salt Sample

Test 2 – (Tap Water Sample to illustrate chlorides present in incoming mains) Yellow: No Nitrates Present, Yellow: Chlorides Present.

Test 2 Tap Water Sample

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What is Asbestos Guttering?

Written on June 14, 2016 at 2:15 pm , by bradleymason

Asbestos guttering, also known as asbestos cement guttering, is often present in asbestos cement roofs. The guttering is located at the eaves of the roof pitch in industrial and warehouse properties.  Asbestos cement gutters suffer …

Asbestos guttering, also known as asbestos cement guttering, is often present in asbestos cement roofs. The guttering is located at the eaves of the roof pitch in industrial and warehouse properties.  Asbestos cement gutters suffer from a number of common faults – such as leaks, cracks and the build-up of debris – that can escalate if left unattended over time, so routine maintenance is important. There is also a risk of asbestos contamination if the underside becomes friable.

Under the “Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012” the “Dutyholder” has the responsibility to manage asbestos.  The “Dutyholder” may be the owner or the leaseholder depending upon the building and the terms of the tenancy.  The lease must be scrutinised to understand the responsibilities and requirements. Whilst asbestos cement is not a Licensed form of Asbestos, it must still be managed in accordance with the Regulations and all works implemented in accordance with HSE Guidelines for working with none licenced asbestos.

We have come across various issues regarding asbestos guttering when conducting both Dilapidations Surveys and Acquisition Surveys for clients.  Not many commercial property Dutyholders are aware they have asbestos guttering.  Due to this lack of awareness, it can fall into disrepair, which is often expensive to repair and/or replace and can pose a risk if it becomes friable.  The images below show an example of asbestos guttering having fallen into disrepair on a commercial property.  These examples are some of the worst we have seen and will require immediate attention.

Asbestos Guttering 1

Asbestos Guttering 2

Acquisition Surveys

Where clients are considering a commercial expansion, an acquisition survey is essential to ensure that they have a full understanding of the existing condition of the commercial property, including the building structure and any major defects that have been identified. The risks imposed by the presence of asbestos must be considered and if acquired by a landlord for commercial letting, the presence of asbestos can deter potential tenants.

Dilapidations Surveys

Where a tenant is leaving a commercial property, the deterioration of asbestos guttering under their tenancy could incur some hefty costs if left unattended. It is, therefore, important that clients are made aware as to whether or not their commercial premises uses asbestos guttering so that they can make the necessary preparations to resolve any issues should they arise.

If you are nearing the end of a tenancy, or are considering a property for a commercial expansion, it is recommended that you get in touch with an expert to find out the state of repairs on the property guttering. If you are unsure as to whether or not the property has asbestos guttering, get in touch with us today and one of our experienced surveyors will be able to provide this information following a detailed report.

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An overview on the Minimum Energy Standards and possible implications on Dilapidation Issues.

Written on June 5, 2016 at 10:10 am , by bradleymason

Bradley Mason

The Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEES or ‘MEPS’) will affect commercial property Landlords and Tenants from the 1st April 2018.  The new legislation (MEES) came into force following the Houses of Parliament approving The …

Bradley Mason

The Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEES or ‘MEPS’) will affect commercial property Landlords and Tenants from the 1st April 2018.  The new legislation (MEES) came into force following the Houses of Parliament approving The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property in England and Wales) Regulations 2015 under the Energy Act 2011 in March 2015.

The regulation triggers a mechanism that allows enforcement of Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) within Private Rented Property across England and Wales under the Energy Act 2011.  From the 1st April 2018, a lease or lease renewal will be unable to be granted of a commercial property with an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of F or G.  With all leases of Private Rented Properties that commence before 1st April 2018 must comply from the 1st April 2023.

MEES, however, does not affect freehold sales and purchases however, could have a negative impact on the value of a property.  Also, the regulations do not affect owner-occupiers or tenants until 2023 unless they wish to sub-let.

Further exemptions depending on the type of building (place of worship, listed etc.), tenancy agreement length and impacts on the buildings structure if improved.  *Please contact us for more information on exemptions.

Even though the legislation does not come into effect until April 2018 for commercial properties landlords and tenants should begin to think about the impact and take time to analyse the implications to current and new lease tenancies.  This is even more imperative with the potential penalty notices that could be enforced on Landlords if they breach the legislation.  Financial penalties can reach a maximum of £150,000.

The Impact MEES will have on Dilapidation Matters

Bradley Mason

The legislation will affect existing leases from the 1st April 2023, which will cause a headache for dilapidation surveyors advising their client on interim and terminal dilapidation matters on properties that don’t meet the MEES requirements.

Mid-term issues such as improvements to M&E plant will need to be discussed between the LL and T in relation to logistics of undertaking the works.  If tenants refuse access ‘Get-out’ clauses within leases could be triggered.

It is certain that there will be an increased take-up of collaborative ‘green’ lease provisions to facilitate access for improvements in accordance with MEES.  Service charge issues which look to exclude liability for energy enhancements to minimise financial exposure will become a prevalent issue.

Tenants could negotiate a cheaper/free rental period over the course of the works being implemented for inconvenience to business disruption if you take on a current F or G stock building.  This therefore supports the need for Technical Due Diligence at the pre-construction stage.

In the case of a building with a poor EPC, the question of supersession will inevitable arise if, at lease end, a landlord needs to implement extensive works to bring the building up to MEES compliance standard.  Wholesale replacement of mechanical or electrical equipment due to poor energy efficiency rather than disrepair will fall outside of a typical repairing obligation under a dilapidations case.  A significant portion of a dilapidations claim could be extinguished if replacing plant leads to a further full refurbishment of the building.

Summary:

Bradley Mason Services

As with any hot topic in the Building Surveying profession, MEES is no different and there are a varying opinions on the impact of this regulation especially in relation to dilapidations claims.  As ever dilapidations matters must be considered on a case by case basis with regard to the lease documents and issues with the specific property.

Whilst MEES do not fundamentally change standard dilapidations procedures, energy enhancement works both mid-term and at term end will surely increase in prevalence and the impact of such improvements must be considered.

Landlords need to identify cost effective improvements early on and put in place strategic plans for implementing such works in advance of the 2018 and 2023 deadlines.

All parties of a lease need to understand the implications of this new legislation and the possible outcomes both mid-term and at lease end regarding dilapidation issues. For more information please contact one of our team.

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Reinstatement works at Tadcaster Medical Centre

Written on May 31, 2016 at 2:15 pm , by bradleymason

Bradley Mason have been appointed as Project Managers, overseeing the reinstatement works at Tadcaster Medical Centre following flood damage caused to the building.  The works entail a full strip-out of internal finishes including flood damaged …

Bradley Mason have been appointed as Project Managers, overseeing the reinstatement works at Tadcaster Medical Centre following flood damage caused to the building.  The works entail a full strip-out of internal finishes including flood damaged plaster and a full refurbishment across the ground floor.  Prior to commencement of the works on each phase, specialist drying consultants are brought in to speed dry the building to remove all residual moisture.  Flood resilience measures have been considered and implemented including upgrading the dispensary counter to a full metal system which can be wiped clean following possible future flooding.  Phase 1 works are now complete and the rooms shown in the images are in-use by the team.

Tadcaster Medical Cente - Survey Photo - 07.01.16399
Tadcaster Medical Centre - Site Progress Meeting (70)

For more information on the services we provide and how we can help you, get in touch with us today on 01423 534 604 or fill out the form found on our contact page.

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Stamford Bridge Under 10’s girls football team

Written on May 27, 2016 at 2:00 pm , by bradleymason

Bradley Mason are proud to sponsor the Stamford Bridge Under 10’s girls 7 a side football team who recently won the league.


Football

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Bradley Mason are proud to sponsor the Stamford Bridge Under 10’s girls 7 a side football team who recently won the league.

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